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Reblogged from buzzfeed
Reblogged from buzzfeed
buzzfeed:

Did you know that the first jack-o’-lanterns were actually made from turnips?

Dear!

buzzfeed:

Did you know that the first jack-o’-lanterns were actually made from turnips?

Dear!

Reblogged from mydarkenedeyes
mydarkenedeyes:

AngryWhistler | Prints available here.

Oui.

mydarkenedeyes:

AngryWhistler | Prints available here.

Oui.

Reblogged from cross-connect
Reblogged from alexleo
As every frustrated American knows, no major banking executive has gone to prison or has been fined any significant amount in the aftermath of the financial crisis. But what’s astonishing is that Wall Street bankers seem not to have paid any social cost either. They sit on corporate and nonprofit boards and attend functions and galas. They remain top Wall Street executives, or even serve as regulators. The nation’s prominent op-ed pages, talk shows and conferences seek their opinions. If you are rich, you must be intelligent. Your views must be worthwhile, never mind the track record. Why Do We Keep Swooning Over Failed Bankers? - ProPublica (via alexleo)

Jail Time is Due.

(via soupsoup)

Reblogged from soupsoup
Reblogged from bbook
bbook:

What stuck with me the most after reading Joe Nocera’s New York Times piece about Lauren Greenfield and her documentary The Queen of Versailles—arguably the most important documentary of the year—was her apparent guilt about revealing the subjects for who they really are. In case you haven’t read or heard, Greenfield’s film chronicles the Siegel family—worth a billion dollars and in the midst of building a 90,000-square-foot mega-mansion—from 2009 to 2011, right in the teeth of the recent recession. Even more incredible, David Siegel made his fortunes through his timeshare company Westgate Resorts, which sells the majority of their timeshare properties to people who usually cannot afford them. They were cinematically perfect subjects for an examination of the over-consumptive top one-percent in America during a financial meltdown. Greenfield captures the Siegel family’s obliviousness, stubbornness, and gaudy repugnance with equally shocking, sad, and humorous grace, culminating in the loss of one of Westgate’s most prized business assets and the discounted, unfinished hotel-sized home being put up for sale. The film should be a lesson to all of us about wealth and irresponsibility and how history has, once again, repeated itself. Greenfield should be proud.
Yet she seems protective of the Siegels, that there may be some inner turmoil for leading all of us to their palace gates. Part of this may be strategy, due to the defamation lawsuit the still very wealthy and powerful David Siegel filed against Greenfield, among others, a week before The Queen of Versailles premiered at Sundance—even though his wife attended the screening and sat right beside the director. However, it’s these types of contradictions that may give insight into another source of the talented filmmaker’s guilt: are her subjects living metaphors for American overconsumption or just a specific case of filthy rich people who have lost all sense of reality? Greenfield and I chatted about the film in a large empty ballroom of a luxury hotel about how the film came together around her and why she cared what the Siegels ultimately thought.

Sell a time share to the times shared.Perfect.

bbook:

What stuck with me the most after reading Joe Nocera’s New York Times piece about Lauren Greenfield and her documentary The Queen of Versailles—arguably the most important documentary of the year—was her apparent guilt about revealing the subjects for who they really are. In case you haven’t read or heard, Greenfield’s film chronicles the Siegel family—worth a billion dollars and in the midst of building a 90,000-square-foot mega-mansion—from 2009 to 2011, right in the teeth of the recent recession. Even more incredible, David Siegel made his fortunes through his timeshare company Westgate Resorts, which sells the majority of their timeshare properties to people who usually cannot afford them. They were cinematically perfect subjects for an examination of the over-consumptive top one-percent in America during a financial meltdown. Greenfield captures the Siegel family’s obliviousness, stubbornness, and gaudy repugnance with equally shocking, sad, and humorous grace, culminating in the loss of one of Westgate’s most prized business assets and the discounted, unfinished hotel-sized home being put up for sale. The film should be a lesson to all of us about wealth and irresponsibility and how history has, once again, repeated itself. Greenfield should be proud.

Yet she seems protective of the Siegels, that there may be some inner turmoil for leading all of us to their palace gates. Part of this may be strategy, due to the defamation lawsuit the still very wealthy and powerful David Siegel filed against Greenfield, among others, a week before The Queen of Versailles premiered at Sundance—even though his wife attended the screening and sat right beside the director. However, it’s these types of contradictions that may give insight into another source of the talented filmmaker’s guilt: are her subjects living metaphors for American overconsumption or just a specific case of filthy rich people who have lost all sense of reality? Greenfield and I chatted about the film in a large empty ballroom of a luxury hotel about how the film came together around her and why she cared what the Siegels ultimately thought.

Sell a time share to the times shared.Perfect.

Reblogged from kateoplis
Soothing words are nice but… not just in generalities, specifically, what are [you] going to do about guns? Mayor Bloomberg to Obama and Romney

This could be the nutshell question. “Seriously, what are you going to do”.

Reblogged from kateoplis
Reblogged from joshbyard
joshbyard:

An Engineer’s Plan to Use Swarm Robots to Make Smart Buildings Behave More Like  Super-Organisms

Using swarms of robotic sensors that “chase” a structure’s human occupants, he wants buildings to understand everything about us, down to our emotional state.
These robot sensors will learn from their mistakes, self-regulate using digital “hormones”, and record information over the course of years, building up a record of experiences to be used as “DNA” to program future versions of themselves, or even other buildings.
“Living organisms give birth to the next generation, and have immunity to viruses such as influenza,” says Mita in a video promoting his work. “Our idea was that we wanted to give architecture this kind of biological response capability.”

(via BBC - Future - Technology - Robot swarms aim to bring buildings to life ht Kurzweil AI)


A coming wave?

joshbyard:

An Engineer’s Plan to Use Swarm Robots to Make Smart Buildings Behave More Like  Super-Organisms

Using swarms of robotic sensors that “chase” a structure’s human occupants, he wants buildings to understand everything about us, down to our emotional state.

These robot sensors will learn from their mistakes, self-regulate using digital “hormones”, and record information over the course of years, building up a record of experiences to be used as “DNA” to program future versions of themselves, or even other buildings.

“Living organisms give birth to the next generation, and have immunity to viruses such as influenza,” says Mita in a video promoting his work. “Our idea was that we wanted to give architecture this kind of biological response capability.”

(via BBC - Future - Technology - Robot swarms aim to bring buildings to life ht Kurzweil AI)

A coming wave?

(via emergentfutures)